Effective

Bridge 127What makes humans so special? Our ability to reason may be what most distinguishes us from other animals. We can consider our motivations, plan ahead, and look back on what we’ve done to understand how it went. But we are far from omniscient: our brains are designed to be efficient rather than perfect (if perfect is even possible). Because of this, we frequently make errors in judgement, and even convince ourselves of having made decisions that others made for us.

Erman Misirlisoy PhD.

Luxury

Sunrising South CarolinaLast year, the New York Times called sleep the “new status symbol.” I’m not sure I accept the idea of a good night’s rest as a status symbol—although I suppose the resulting glowing skin, high-functioning metabolism, and sharp mind may raise one’s standing. But done right, sleep is certainly the ultimate luxury.

Jenni Avins

Rescue

Image from page 226 of "North Carolina journal of education" (1897)Jessica Lahey, a middle-school teacher and author, writes in The Gift of Failure that we sometimes seem to be more worried about raising happy children than competent or autonomous ones. “We think, ‘I have plenty of time to teach them,’” Lahey writes. “And then they are 17.” Don’t rescue your kids, she advises. Play the long game—raising the competent kid—not the short one, attempting to fix every problem. If they own their mistakes, they are more likely to learn from them.

Jenny Anderson

School at home

Farrers School for deaf children - Liverpool Road AshfieldSome people think that self-directed education, or ‘kids doing whatever they want,’ means zero responsibility,. In fact, the opposite is true. Kids in conventional educational [settings] have very little responsibility, because ultimately the school, the teacher, or the curriculum designer is given credit for kids’ success or failure. In self-directed education, the learner is making all the decisions, so they get all the credit for their own success or failure. That is responsibility.

Aaron Browder

The ultimate luxury

Sleepy faceLast year, the New York Times called sleep the “new status symbol.” I’m not sure I accept the idea of a good night’s rest as a status symbol—although I suppose the resulting glowing skin, high-functioning metabolism, and sharp mind may raise one’s standing. But done right, sleep is certainly the ultimate luxury.

Jenni Avins